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New Zealand Government teaches agile leadership to kids!

April 25, 2012

One intriguing piece of news I was told about whilst researching my new book, is the introduction of Agile into high-schools in New Zealand  from next year.  Final year students will understand and practically use an iterative development lifecycle and the concepts of test-driven development will be taught. Students will be required to demonstrate teamwork – including the organisation of independent testing.

The new ICT syllabus is very broad – ranging from how mp3 players work to e-commerce and the impact of ICT on society.  Although traditional programming skills are being taught, the stress is on getting a ‘taste of the discipline to find out if it suits them or not, rather than making up their minds based on incorrect information and mislabelled topics’.

The syllabus is now implemented, and researchers are tracking the students through the system to assess the impact.  The output of the first ‘agile’ high-school graduates into work and higher education is expected in 2014…

Brian Wernham is author of “Agile Project Management for Government” to be published by Maitland and Strong on 31st July 2012.  (Pre-order at www.maitland-and-strong.com or www.maitland-and-strong.co.uk )

© Brian Wernham 2012 CC BY-NC-ND

 

References

Dinning, N. (2009): Technological Context Knowledge and skills. Exploring specific knowledge and skills to support programmes in technology. Materials for consultation to support Ministry decision making. http://www.techlink.org.nz/curriculum-support/tks/resources/Technological-Context-Knowledge-and-Skills-07-2009.pdf

Bell, Tim; Andreae, Peter; Lambert, Lynn (2010): Computer Science in New Zealand high schools. In : Proceedings of the Twelfth Australasian Conference on Computing Education – Volume 103. Darlinghurst, Australia, Australia: Australian Computer Society, Inc (ACE ’10), pp. 15‐22. http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=1862219.1862223

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